EEOC Meeting Focuses on Safe and Fair Hiring Practices

criminal record

Experts met with the EEOC to discuss removing barriers to employment for those with arrest and conviction records.

Earlier this week, experts met with the EEOC to discuss removing barriers to employment for those with arrest and conviction records. A press release from the EEOC said:

Employers often refuse to hire people with arrest and conviction records even years after they have completed their sentences, leading to recidivism and higher social services costs, experts told the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) at a meeting today at agency headquarters.

The meeting was part of a series convened by the EEOC to examine the implications of various hiring practices.  In addition to laying out the scope of the issue, the meeting was designed to identify and highlight employers’ best practices, ways in which arrest and conviction records have been used appropriately, and current legal standards.

The press release references many ‘best practice’ examples provided by experts during the meeting, including the following from Michael F. Curtin, Jr., President and CEO of the D.C. Central Kitchen:

Michael F. Curtin, Jr. told the Commissioners of the tremendous success his organization has had educating people returning from the criminal justice system to work in the food service and catering industry.  Many of the individuals trained, employed, and placed in restaurants, hotels and other food service establishments by the D.C. Central Kitchen have had criminal records.

Read More: Striking the Balance Between Workplace Fairness and Workplace Safety

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Article Published July 28, 2011

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