Who Pays for Bribery? The Company or the Perpetrators?

Tyson

In February, Tyson Foods agreed to settle charges against the company for violating the FCPA. However, those responsible for the violations were not charged.

In February, Tyson Foods agreed to settle charges against the company for violating the FCPA. However, those responsible for the violations were not charged. An article by James B. Stewart in the ‘Business Day’ section of the New York Times discusses the Tyson case from the very beginning:

“In late June 2004, a plant manager for one of Tyson Foods’ poultry processing plants in Mexico sent a memo to company headquarters in Springdale, Ark.: two women who “most definitely do not work for Tyson Foods in Mexico” each were paid 30,700 pesos, or about $2,700, a month and had been for years. Tyson is one of the world’s largest producers of poultry, pork and beef products, a ubiquitous presence in American supermarkets that has been trying to increase foreign sales. The memo set off an ethics scandal that reached into Tyson’s executive suite and raises questions about who, if anyone, is being held accountable for high-level corporate crime.”

The article goes on to discuss who those two ladies were and what was done after the memo was sent.  Stewart also raises the ever-important question: what about those at Tyson responsible for the bribery scheme?

Read More: “Bribery, but Nobody Was Charged

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Article Published June 29, 2011

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