A Labor Day Present from the NLRB

A brand new app to help employees and employers get the facts on their mobile devices

Posted by Dawn Lomer in Employment Law, Human Resources on September 3rd, 2013

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has released its own app, just in time for Labor Day. It’s a great move, considering the 82,000 public inquiries the NLRB addressed last year.

It’s free for iPhone and Android users and provides employers, employees and unions with information on their rights and obligations under the NLRA.

From the press release:

“The National Labor Relations Act guarantees the right of workers to join together, with or without a union, to improve their working lives,” notes NLRB Chairman Mark Gaston Pearce.  “The promise of the law can only be fulfilled when employers and employees understand their rights and obligations.  With this app, we are using 21st Century technology to inform and educate the public about the law and their rights.”

Under its “What’s the Law?” section, the app has sections for  employers, employees and unions, and has a contact NLRB page that includes telephone numbers and an application to locate the nearest NLRB office by region, and on a map.

Information for Employers

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Under the employers section there are eight choices, explaining the law as it relates to:

  • interfering with employee rights
  • interfering with or dominating a union
  • discriminating against employees because of their union activities or sympathies
  • discriminating against employees for NLRB activity
  • bargaining in good faith with employees’ union representative
  • election-related content

The app also explains the process the NLRB uses in elections held to determine whether employees wish to be collectively represented.

Information for Employees and Unions

The information for employees section is divided for those who are and are not represented by a union and each has a list of areas with summaries of the law.

I looked up social media:

Whether or not you are represented by a union, federal law gives you the right to join together with coworkers to improve your lives at work – including joining together in cyberspace, such as on Facebook.

I wonder how many employees are going to have that one permanently displayed on their smartphone screens.

 


Dawn Lomer
Dawn Lomer

Managing Editor

Dawn Lomer is the managing editor at i-Sight Software and a Certified Fraud Examiner (CFE). She writes about topics related to workplace investigations, ethics and compliance, data security and e-discovery, and hosts i-Sight webinars.